Guest Talk: Critical Dialogues & Diverse Perspectives on African Education: Roundtable Discussion, Tuesday, 4/26, 6-8pm

We are pleased to announce the following guest talks:

  • Critical Dialogues and Diverse Perspectives on African Education: Roundtable Discussion, Tuesday, 4/26, 6-8pm


  • This roundtable discussion is open to TC students and scholars, civil society organizations and community leaders, educators, and to all members of the Harlem and greater NYC communities. Participants will grapple with the question, how can we disrupt narratives of Afro-Pessimism and promote more nuanced portrayals of Africa? The discussion will explore the ways scholars reproduce or confront Afro-pessimist narratives in their work, the ways Afro-pessimism influences the experiences of African immigrant youth in the U.S., and the ways that it influences the experiences of African-American, Afro-Latin, and Afro-Caribbean students and their interactions with African immigrant youth and with news/media about Africa.

    This event is co-sponsored by the George Clement Bond Center for African Education and Gottesman Libraries.

    Please rsvp no later than Friday, April 22nd with your details.

    Where: 305 Russell

  • Why Muslim Women Are Reinterpreting the Qur`an and Rethinking Hadith, with Nimat Hafez Barazangi, Thursday, 4/14, 4-5pm


  • Let us warmly welcome Dr. Nimat Hafez Barazangi, alumna of Teachers College, as she presents a lecture on Thursday, April 14th entitled, Why Muslim Women Are Reinterpreting the Qur`an and Rethinking Hadith.

    Because the true message of Islam concerning women was rarely practiced throughout the past 14 centuries of Muslim history, women scholar-activists who self-identify with Islam have been taking it upon themselves to reinterpret the Qur`an and change attitudes about gender. But their writings do not seem to reach those politicized mostly male Muslims who are running the present social and political affairs in Muslim societies. To the contrary, these male extremists are leading a counter-revolution against gender justice by taking Qur`anic verses out of their context and misusing the Prophet Muhammad reported Hadith (narratives). Thus, I am making wake-up calls to Muslim women to stand up for their given rights in the Qur`an and to rethink the authority of the Hadith, especially those narratives that contradict the Qur`an. Although Muslim women are majority college graduates in most Muslim societies, only few participate in developing and shaping Islamic thought. I will present some examples to analyze how basic principles of Islam are re-read to facilitate building an androgynous, civic attitude among young Muslims, particularly females.

    Nimat Hafez Barazangi is a Research Fellow at Cornell University, where she works on Muslim and Arab Women's Education, Identity Development and Belief System; as well as Feminist and Gender Studies. She has published three monographs: Her most recent is Woman's Identity and Rethinking the Hadith (2015), with an endorsement stating the book as "brave and passionate plea for Muslim women to reclaim the egalitarian message of their faith, which was eclipsed after the Prophet's death by the exclusion of women from positions of leadership and from participation in the production of religious knowledge; Her highly reviewed Woman's Identity and the Qur'an: A New Reading (2004), labeled by one reviewer as "the most radical book in the last 14th centuries of Islam;" and her co-edited volume, Islamic Identity and the Struggle for Justice (1996), that is still in circulation. She also published over 50 research articles, book reviews, and edited journals. Some of her books and articles are translated into Arabic, German, and Spanish.

    Nimat Hafez Barazangi received her B.A. from Damascus University, Syria; M.A. from Teachers College, Columbia University; and Ph.D. from Cornell University. She received the Glock Award from Cornell for her 1988 Ph.D. Dissertation, the first on American Muslims education, "Perceptions of the Islamic Belief System: The Muslims in North America." Other honors include Senior Fulbright Scholarship to Syria 2005-2006 and 1995-1997; United Nations Development Program Fellowships 2002 and 1999; and Visiting Fellowship from Oxford University's Centre of Islamic Studies 1994.

    This event is co-sponsored by the offices of Planned Giving and Alumni Relations and Gottesman Libraries.

    Please rsvp by Tuesday, April 12th with your details.

    Watch and comment on the recorded talk here on Vialogues, the award winning discussion platform that provides a space for users to hold meaningful and dynamic time-stamped discussions about videos.

    Where: 305 Russell

  • Linking Research and Policy in Education: A (Sceptical) View from across the Pond, with Geoff Whitty, Thursday, 4/14, 3:30-5pm


  • Geoff Whitty first became interested in the study of education policy while an undergraduate student at Cambridge in the mid-1960s. In this presentation, he will reflect on his subsequent fifty year career in education research and consider how education research and education policy have changed over the years. He will chart the often troubled relationship between research and policy in the field of education and suggest that the brave new world of "what works" and "evidence-based policy" is unlikely to bring an end to the troubles. Furthermore, he will argue that it should not be allowed to dominate the agenda at the expense of other research traditions.

    For ten years, from 2000 until 2010, Geoff Whitty was Director of the University of London's Institute of Education, which (like Teachers College) is one of the world's leading graduate schools of education. In the Queen's Birthday Honours List in 2011, he was awarded a CBE for services to teacher education. He is now Director Emeritus of the UCL Institute of Education, as well as holding a Research Professorship at Bath Spa University, UK and a Global Innovation Chair in Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia. His many publications include Making Sense of Education Policy (Sage, 2002), while his latest book, Research and Policy in Education: Evidence, Ideology and Impact, was published last month by UCL IOE Press.

    Nancy Lesko, Professor of Education, Maxine Greene Professor, will introduce Dr. Whitty.

    This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

    Please rsvp by Tuesday, April 12th with your details.

    Where: 104b Russell

  • Coffee Hour with Deogratias "Deo" Niyizonkiza, rescheduled for Wednesday, 4/13, 11:30am-12:30pm


  • Deogratias "Deo" Niyizonkiza, visionary Founder and CEO of Village Health Works, will speak about Village Health Works and its education program in Burundi, describe opportunities for students to get involved in the future, and gather contact information from interested students.

    Deogratias "Deo" Niyizonkiza is a leading advocate for the most impoverished people in the world. His compassion, expertise, and life experience have made him a key voice in global health and international development. An American citizen, Deo was born in rural Burundi, where he attended grade school and part of medical school. He left the country during the catastrophic war that lasted more than a decade and took the lives of hundreds of thousands people. Deo survived not only this man-made tragedy and poverty, but also homelessness in New York City.

    Deo's life journey is told in Pulitzer Prize-winner Tracy Kidder's most recent work, Strength in What Remains, a New York Times best seller named one of the best books of the year by the Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, and the Chicago Tribune.

    More on Deo's bio can be found here.

    This event is co-sponsored by the George Clement Bond Center for African Education and Gottesman Libraries.

    Please rsvp by Tuesday, April 12th with your details.

    Where: 305 Russell

  • Critical Dialogues and Diverse Perspectives on African Education: Voices from the Academy, Tuesday, 4/12, 6-8pm


  • This event will feature a panel of scholars and students with research and professional experience related to education in Africa and the African Diaspora. Professors, students, and alumni from TC will share perspectives from their work on issues of education in Africa and the African Diaspora.

    This event is co-sponsored by the George Clement Bond Center for African Education and Gottesman Libraries.

    Please rsvp no later than Friday, April 8th with your details.

    Where: 306 Russell


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