News Displays: Education for All Handicapped Children's Act, Thursday, 11/30

Need to keep current, look to the past, teach a topic? The Everett Cafe features daily postings of news from around the world, and also promotes awareness of historical events from an educational context. Be sure to check the news postings on Learning at the Library, where you can delve into history.

  • Education for All Handicapped Children's Act, Thursday, 11/30


  • The Education for All Handicapped Children's Act was signed into law by President Gerald Ford on November 30, 1975. This important legislation required all public schools accepting federal funds to provide equal access to education and one free meal a day for children with physical and mental disabilities. In addition public schools were required to evaluate disabled children and create an educational plan with parent input that would emulate as closely as possible the educational experience of non-disabled students. Other requirements were that school districts provide administrative procedures for parents of disabled children to dispute decisions, and to ensure the least restrictive environments for disabled students.

  • Sesame Street Debuts, Friday, 11/10


  • On November 10, 1969 Sesame Street debuted on public broadcasting stations. Conceived by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett, this educational and entertaining television show, complete with puppets (known as Muppets designed by Jm Henson) living in a fictional New York City neighborhood, sought to prepare young children for school, by presenting the alphabet and how to count. Sesame Street has earned over eight Grammys and one hundred Emmys, surpassing all other children's shows, as it moves with the times and reaches its 47th season in 2017.

  • Founders Day at Teachers College, Wednesday, 11/15


  • Did you know that the opening of the new brick and red sandstone building on 120th Street, otherwise known as Teachers College, occurred on November 15, 1894, Founders Day, which has been celebrated here throughout the decades? The original dedication ceremony was a relatively simple one, including speakers from Columbia University, Harvard University, and John Hopkins, while President Walter Hervey of Teachers College presided. Throughout the afternoon and evening, members of the Trustees, faculty, and students conducted hundreds of visitors on tours throughout the building, and the long day closed with dinner for the Trustees and speeches at the home of Grace Hoadley Dodge, treasurer of the College.

  • William Heard Kilpatrick Is Born, Monday, 11/20


  • William Heard Kilpatrick, major figure in the progressive education movement of the early 20th century, was born on November 20, 1871 in White Plains, Georgia. He was Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he taught from 1912-1937, and he is considered one of the most popular professors ever at Teachers College. In addition to teaching and writing, Kilpatrick engaged in a variety of other endeavors related to the promotion of progressive education principles. A co-founder of Bennington (VT) College, he served as president of its board of trustees from 1931-1938. He also formed the Kilpatrick Discussion Group with several other Teachers College faculty members, which met from its inception through World War II. Kilpatrick was a founding member of the John Dewey Society in 1935 and served as the organization's leader until 1957. He edited the Society's first yearbook, The Teacher and Society(1937) and co-edited its ninth yearbook Intercultural Attitudes in the Making (1947).

    Dr. Kilpatrick's highly popular work "The Project Method" (1918) made him well known among educators throughout the United States. This approach focuses on the interests of children, which advocates that by using their interests as units of study, learning becomes more relevant and meaningful. His most prominent book Foundations of Method (1925) became a widely used textbook in education courses nationwide.


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