January Newsletter: Education Program

The Gottesman Libraries



The Gottesman Libraries Education Program informs students, faculty and staff about the latest thinking in education, in ways that engage members of the community with one another and with a broad range of educational experts. The program also provides understanding of work being done throughout the college.


Tours:


Welcome new and returning students! Spring Term is upon us, us and we invite you to become acquainted with resources and services by joining us for a friendly, informative walk around the Library. Come and explore!


  • Tuesday, January 21, 3pm
  • Wednesday, January 22, 11am
  • Thursday, January 23, 12pm
  • Friday, January 24, 2pm


Open to members and affiliated members of Teachers College, all tours meet at the First Floor Library Services Desk, and last approximately 45 minutes. 


If you’d like to join us at another time, please let us know and we will gladly arrange.


Workshops:


Regularly scheduled instructional offerings include workshops, tours, orientations, and course-specific instruction in coordination with staff and faculty of the College.


Research Reboot, Thursday, 1/23, 3-4pm


In this workshop we will review important resources and strategies to use the library most effectively. We will focus on key tools for finding books, articles, archives, curriculum, video, blogs, and much more. Come with your research topic, and we will gladly explore multiple routes to information -- leading to the discovery of your preferences in research methodology.


Please rsvp by Wednesday, January 22nd with your details.


Where: 104b Russell


Guest Talks:


Performativity, Presentism and Practice: New Teacher Survival and Development, with Adam Unwin Wednesday, 1/29, 4-5pm


Dr. Adam Unwin will present aspects of his work and research with new teachers (in England) who undertake a Masters module during their newly qualified teacher (NQT) year. The work explores how new teachers can understand and develop their practice in pressurized working contexts. 


In these contexts Performativity (Ball, 2003) and marketization agendas foster cultures of high stakes assessment at all levels: students, teachers and schools. Presentism (Hargreaves, 2009) exists in several forms with immediacy and results being foregrounded over the consideration of longer-term perspectives on learning. These factors along with teacher shortages and high turnover (Perryman, 2019) undermine more nuanced teacher development. 


In this case careful pedagogic design including online discussions allows professional development that foregrounds the situated experiences of teachers. This provides a ‘way in’ for new teachers to understand more fully the complexities, dilemmas and strategies encountered in their own and others’ professional practice. Developing reflexivity in teachers will counter presentism. Reflexive teachers are likely to feel uncomfortable with the short term and narrow focus of the management approaches and strategies that encourage presentism. Moreover, put simply they will ‘see them for what they are’, be able to critically locate them within current performativity and high stakes assessment agendas. By thinking about and problematizing the complexities of their teaching, they are more able to debate (with colleagues and students) about what alternatives might be usefully considered to the neo-liberal model for education. 


Adam Unwin is Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Education, University College London. He is currently program leader for the Master of Teaching (MTeach) a course specifically for practising teachers. Research interests include new teacher learning, the role of technology in education, work related learning and global development education. Adam has worked on various education projects in the UK and overseas. His postgraduate work includes an MSc in Development Studies and a Doctorate in Education. He has been an active trade unionist throughout his career. 


This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Innovation in Teacher Education and Development. RSVP here.


Where: 306 Russell


Where We’re From & the Effects of Displacement, with Tia Dorsey and Guests, Thursday, 1/30, 7-9pm


Please join us for the closing talk, Where We're From and the Effects of Displacement,with artist Tia Dorsey and panelists, in coordination with the closing of the Offit Gallery exhibit on display through February 17th.


As more carry-outs within the Brooklyn and Washington, DC area are being displaced due to gentrification, how can we begin to help protect and preserve these cultural landmarks in our own neighborhoods? Learn about the ways in which each panelist attempts to do so through their artistic efforts, passion projects, and activism in an intimate conversation about these carry-outs and what it means to define home.


Presenters:


Tia Dorsey is an artist, curator, and photographer from Washington, DC. Dorsey is currently in her second year of her master’s program in arts administration at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her work, including the black & white photography series, “what once was,” focuses on dismantling preconceived notions regarding the presence of black bodies in changing spaces that were originally shaped by and for them. Ultimately, Dorsey aims to protect these spaces through her work, culminating in a master’s thesis that is designed to serve as a call to action for the proper preservation of localized black culture. 


Nation Perkins is Press Assistant at the U.S. House of Representatives. She is a designer and digital content strategist from Washington D.C. In 2018, Perkins launched the (202) Capsule through his co-founded brand, “The Pack.” The capsule is a collection of clothing, photography and art that highlights the effects of gentrification and violence on DC’s rich, localized culture—an intersection that Perkins has witnessed first hand as a native. As a designer and content creator, Perkins aims to develop content strategies that will simultaneously help introduce facets of DC culture to non-natives while giving DC natives a chance to celebrate and reminisce on what makes DC’s culture so unique.


Jenée-Daria is the Curatorial Assistant for the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum where she supports in the research and organization of numerous exhibitions. She has worked on projects examining Black subjectivity through historical precedents, including her first independent co-curation of what once was in August of 2019 (Gloria Gail Gallery, NYC). Jenée-Daria aims to expand her knowledge of art history, and integrate her interests in performative practices, to examine performance within the museum setting. She serves on the Dance/NYC Junior Committee and holds a BFA from Florida State University.


This talk is co-sponsored by Student Advocates for the Arts in partnership with the Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Community Affairs, the Office of Student Affairs, and the Arts Administration Program.


Where: 306 Russell


News Displays:


Need to keep current, look to the past, teach a topic? The Everett Cafe features daily postings of news from around the world, and also promotes awareness of historical events from an educational context. Be sure to check the new postings on the library website where you can delve into history.


Zora Neal Hurston Is Born, Tuesday, 1/7

Aristotle's Lyceum Is Found, Wednesday, 1/15

Remembering James Wells, Monday, 1/20

The Raven Is Published, Wednesday, 1/29


Live Music:


The Everett Cafe Music Program sponsors performances by TC student and affiliated musicians. Come enjoy a variety of genres and styles!


Want to play in Everett Cafe? If you'd like to showcase your talents, please contact us with details via online support. Solos, duets, trios are welcome, and we are looking for student volunteers, as well as TC alumni who wish to perform. Acoustical instruments are welcome, as well as variety of genres.


Everett News Cafe: Just Peachy!, through January


In the history of our nation only two presidents have ever been impeached: Andrew Johnson, for violating the Tenure of Office Act, and Bill Clinton, for perjury and obstruction of justice. Both were later acquitted by the United States Senate. Although other presidents have been threatened with impeachment, only two have faced formal impeachment inquiries in the House of Representatives: Richard Nixon, who resigned before he could be impeached as a consequence of the Watergate scandal, and Donald Trump, primarily under investigation for his dealings with the Ukraine and its influence on elections.


Just Peachy! explores the history of impeachment and its implications and controversies within the broad political spectrum. Included are educational resources that inform the process and call us to take a stand, as we weigh the gravity of this matter which is all over the news.


At the Everett News Cafe, you'll find a new book collection every few weeks that relates to current affairs, education, or learning environments.


Staff Picks: Book Pot Luck, through February


The word "potluck" comes from communal eating traditions. Whether bringing food to a friend on a visit or pooling resources in hard times, the "luck of the pot" provides nourishment for the body, the soul, and the community. The library is a gathering place for everyone. What better way to share who we are and what we do than with a book buffet curated with the "luck" of our catalog? Whether we're seasoned or still a little green, we library staff members are part of the Teachers College melting pot to help you expand your information palate. We hope that the books we've brought to the table will give you a taste of who we are!


This exhibit is curated by Rachel Altvater, Library Services Associate. in coordination with library staff.


Where: Reading Room, Second Floor


Staff Picks is curated each month by the Gottesman Libraries' staff to highlight resources on educational topics and themes of special interest.


Featured Databases: Mentoring


In January, also known as National Mentoring Month, we highlight databases that cover the literature of mentoring. The history of the month-long celebration dates back to 2002 when President George Bush endorsed the campaign for youth in coordination with Harvard School of Public Health, MENTOR, and the Corporation for National and Community Service. As mentoring takes form through involvement by parents, teachers, coaches, colleagues, so we appreciate its importance in the learning process. Read more on the Library's news feed.


Exhibit: Where We're From, by Tia Dorsey and the Columbia Chinese Calligraphy Club


“Carry-outs are an active fight against displacement just through their very existence.”


As Modele Oyewole once stated in Complex magazine, “America may run on Dunkin’, but the heart of Washington D.C. beats to Chinese carryouts.” For decades, carry-outs have been a staple in urban cities like Washington, DC and Brooklyn, NY, creating a hub for young, Black kids to eat or hang-out.


In Washington, DC specifically, carry-outs have become cultural landmarks in Black neighborhoods. However, as the city continues to experience high rates of displacement within majority Black neighborhoods, not only are carry-outs at stake, but so is DC’s title as a Chocolate City. As a result, Where We’re From specifically aims to protect these culturally-rich infrastructures from gentrification through a curated photographic journey of belonging, reminding us that infrastructures may disappear, but an individual’s story and experience may never be forgotten.


Tia Dorsey is an artist, curator, and photographer from Washington, DC. Dorsey is currently in her second year of her master’s program in arts administration at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her work, including the black & white photography series, what once was, focuses on dismantling preconceived notions regarding the presence of black bodies in changing spaces that were originally shaped by and for them. Ultimately, Dorsey aims to protect these spaces through her work, culminating in a master’s thesis that is designed to serve as a call to action for the proper preservation of localized black culture. 


Nayion Perkins is a content strategist from Washington D.C., who graduated from West Virginia University in May 2018, majoring in Journalism with a minor in Communications. Nayion holds a diverse background in media that includes working for newspapers, radio stations, and independent publications. His various creative roles include writer, layout editor, social media strategist, content curator, press fellow and designer. Additionally, he works as a clothing designer, social media strategist and event planner for his co-founded brand “The Pack.”


Chinese Calligraphy Club Artists include:


  • Xinyuan Zhu
  • Wuyue Chen
  • Ziwei Cheng
  • Jingyi Wang
  • Yumeng Zhang
  • Jingyi Pan
  • Qianhe Ji
  • Fei Wang
  • Juye Wang
  • Wen Lei


This exhibit is presented by Student Advocates for the Arts in partnership with the Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Community Affairs, the Office of Student Affairs, and the Arts Administration Program.


Where: Offit Gallery

When: 12/5 - 2/17; Opening: Thursday, 12/5, 7-9pm, Russell 306


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To request disability-related accommodations contact OASID at oasid@tc.edu, (212) 678-3689, or (646) 755-3144 video phone, as early as possible.



Last Updated: 11:34 am, Tuesday, Jan 21 , 2020