February Newsletter: Education Program

The Gottesman Libraries


The Gottesman Libraries Education Program informs students, faculty and staff about the latest thinking in education, in ways that engage members of the community with one another and with a broad range of educational experts. The program also provides understanding of work being done throughout the college.


Read more about offerings in February!




Workshops


Regularly scheduled instructional offerings include workshops, tours, orientations, and course-specific instruction in coordination with staff and faculty of the College.


Doctoral Student Orientation, Monday, 2/8, 4:30-5pm

Welcome Spring doctoral students and please join us for a brief, though informative library session designed just for you! In coordination with the Office of Graduate Student Life and Development, we will provide Teachers College doctoral students with a broad overview of research support; explanation of Boolean logic; tips on smart searching; value of citation management tools; and further points of reference. Students may register in advance through GSLD.


The Lit Review, Thursday, 2/11, 2-3pm

A review of literature is an essential step in the process of writing a thesis or dissertation, or any paper for publication. It asks that you read and critique articles, books, and other sources that have already been written on your topic or related topics. In the process, you are required to find sources and evaluate the best way to focus your research so that you can contribute to a body of scholarly literature. We will focus on locating the sources you need to conduct your review of the literature, and offer a few pointers to the next steps.

Please rsvp by Tuesday, February 9th with your interest and details, and we'll follow up with a link to the session.


Introduction to Zotero, Tuesday, 2/16, 4-5pm

Long gone are the days of index cards and typed reference lists! Zotero is a free, open-source bibliographic management program that allows you to collect, organize, cite, and share your research. In this workshop we will introduce you to this important tool, help you get started, and offer tips for effectively using Zotero in your studies and research so you can master the art of managing scholarly references.

You may rsvp by Monday, February 15th, and we'll follow up with a link to the session.


Deep Dive Into Dissertation Research, Wednesday, 2/24, 3-4pm

This workshop offers tools and strategies for searching and finding dissertations, works representing original research that is the culmination of a student's doctoral studies in a particular field or topic. You'll learn a few tips in using Proquest Dissertations and Theses Global, from searching by advisor and committee, even to not searching by full text. You will also learn about Pocketknowledge, the digital archive of Teachers College, which contains historical dissertations (Ed'D's 1930-1996), done at Teachers College, as well as select masters theses dating from the early 1900s to the present.

Please rsvp by Monday, February 22nd, and we'll send a link to the workshop.


Talks


Opening Gallery Talk: Warping the Future,: How Craft Led To the Digital World As We Know It, with Francesca Rodriguez Sawaya and Renata de Carvalho Gaui, Thursday, 2/11, 6:30-7:15pm


Please join us for the opening of the virtual exhibit, Warping the Future: How Craft Led To the Digital World As We Know It, with Francesca Rodriguez Sewaya and Renata de Carvalho Gaui. Artists commissioned by the Gottesman Libraries with generous support from the Eugene E. Myers Trust, Francesca and Renata will welcome attendees, introduce their work, and guide visitors through a virtual tour that explores the relationship between the history of crafting and the history of computing, with a special focus on the development of technology and the role of women.


Francesca Rodriguez Sawaya is a Peruvian creative producer and educator based in Brooklyn, New York. Francesca is a Lead Teacher in NYC First where she develops curriculum, manage a Maker Space and teach STEAM related subjects to low income communities. Her workshops include Creativity Lab at Brooklyn Museum and Tangible Data in Ahmedabad, India. Francesca earned an MPS in Interactive Telecommunications from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, a BA in Communication from the University of Lima, and a Diploma in Audiovisual Education from the University of Salamanca.


Renata de Carvalho Gaui is a Brazilian designer, artist, and creative technologist based in Brooklyn, New York. A "jill of all trades within art, design, and technology," Renata has engaged in numerous projects with positive educational impact, including Beyond Punch Cards, Weaving to Code, Coding to Weave; and The Art of Living, the 2018 Myers Fund Art Commission. She holds an MPS in Interactive Telecommunications from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and a BFA in Design and Digital Media from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro.


Please use this link to join the talk.


Guest Talk: Artivism: The Power of Art for Social Transformation and Reclaiming the Hall: Amplifying Community Voices at the Hall of Fame, with Stephanie Lake and Cynthia Tobar, Monday, 2/15, 4-5pm


Please join us for the opening event of Artivism: The Power of Art for Social Transformation, energized by the recently published book, Illuminations of Social Imagination: Learning From Maxine Greene, (Dio Press, 2019), edited by Courtney Weida, Dolapo Adeniji-Neill, and Carolina Cambronero-Varela.


"The concept for this book is inspired by the late Maxine Greene (2000), who described her enduring philosophical focus and legacy of social imagination as “the capacity to invent visions of what should be and what might be in our deficient society, on the streets where we live, in our schools” (p. 5). The purpose of this volume is to examine and illuminate the roles of community organizers and educators who are changing lives through public art and community arts projects. This research originally emerged from a well-attended 2018 conference presentation and exhibition at Teachers College, Columbia University, engaging with the local and international community of arts education and arts administration."

-- Publisher's Description


Stephanie Lake is the Director of the Criminal Justice Program at Adelphi University and has been a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at Adelphi University since 2002. Professor Lake earned her doctorate at the University of Virginia after researching the causes and consequences of race and gender disparities in felony sentencing.  As a faculty member at Adelphi, Professor Lake has served as an advisor to many student organizations on campus and runs the prolific Criminal Justice Club on campus. The CJ Club hosts 3-5 events per semester, many involving the arts as a way for students to challenge injustice in the criminal justice system and inequity in the global system more generally. Past examples have included an annual Clothesline Project, participation in Chalk Up and the Fall Arts Festival, Fair Trade Fashion Shows, hosting Sundown Town workshops, hosting the Yes Men and participating in flash mobs to bring attention to the 25th Anniversary of the worst industrial disaster in history (Bhopal), hosting the director and producer of the documentary, "Every Mother's Son", participation in Die Ins and collaborations with just about every other program, club and organization on campus. 


Cynthia Tobar, Assistant Professor and Head of Archives at Bronx Community College, will discuss "Reclaiming the Hall: Amplifying Community Voices at the Hall of Fame", Chapter 8 of Illuminations of Social Imagination: Learning From Maxine Greene; Professor Tobar will present how the Bronx Community College Archives engages with public art to shift the frameworks of representation alongside artists, scholars, and community members. She will highlight topics covered in her chapter, particularly how the social and political histories of the communities in which the Hall emerged as well as discuss the potential role of new monuments which engage with histories of oppression and prejudice. The author will discuss how the creation of a public art community event provided an opportunity to learn about how community arts-based practitioners can embrace culturally inclusive approaches such as Community-Based Archiving and socially engaged art practices to increase community engagement around issues of diversity and inclusion in public art.


Suggested Resources:

Sheets, Hilary. A Monument Man Gives Memorials New Stories to TellNew York Times, Jan 23, 2020.

Sholette, Gregory. Reimagining Monuments to Make Them Resonate Locally and Personally. Hyperallergic, Nov. 6, 2017.


Please use this link to join the talk. More information. This event is part of Artivism: The Power of Art for Social Transformation, which seeks to engage people in changing society through the power of art. Artivism: The Power of Art for Social Transformation offers multimodal events where presenters share how art, research, community outreach, and other endeavors serve to transform the status quo and nurture change for continuous action in search of a more just society. The program is co-sponsored by Adelphi University and the Gottesman Libraries.


In Conversation with Pam Liou, Thursday, 2/18, 6:30-7:17pm


Following the opening of Warping the Future, the Gottesman Libraries' commissioned art, we are hosting a series of conversations with artists featured in this exhibit. “In Conversation With” explores the artist’s projects, their take on the relationship between craft and technology, and how their practice relates to this intersection.


Pam Liou is computational designer and writer living in Brooklyn, NY. Her work examines tensions between craftsmanship, technology and commerce, revealing the hidden sociopolitical infrastructures undergirding human industry. Her research centers around recoupling the consumer with the producer through design literacy and mass customization, fostering intimacy and efficacy through a dialectical creation process. Pam is a recent graduate of NYU's ITP program, and she is currently developing a desktop jacquard loom as a Project Resident at Eyebeam.


Persons interested in attending may rsvp here.


Jazz for Justice: Top Musicians Playing It Forward, with Alina Bloomgarden, Monday, 2/22, 4-5pm


Music on the Inside (MOTI) invites you to an experiential live performance featuring prominent Jazz musicians and talented musically-engaged individuals in reentry from incarceration. Demonstrating what MOTI does in the prisons, participants will be taught an eight bar blues structure and encouraged to write and share an original blues. This event will demonstrate the healing power of music in building bridges of connection, humanity and hope.


Music on the Inside Inc. (MOTI), a nonprofit charitable organization dedicated to bringing music education and mentorships with professional musicians to individuals impacted by incarceration.


Alina Bloomgarden is the founder of Music on the Inside, Inc. (MOTI), a nonprofit charitable organization dedicated to bringing music education and mentorships with professional musicians to individuals impacted by incarceration. She was a department director and producer at Lincoln Center for over 23 years, where she proposed and produced Jazz at Lincoln Center bringing Wynton Marsalis on as Artistic advisor, in a role he now serves for MOTI. Alina is motivated by the power of music to build direct human connection to our common humanity.


Suggested Resource:

MOTI Film Link


Please use this link to join the live event which is part of Artivism: The Power of Art for Social Transformation. The mission of this interdisciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration is to engage people in changing society through the power of art. Artivism: The Power of Art for Social Transformation offers multimodal events where presenters share how art, research, community outreach, and other endeavors serve to transform the status quo and nurture change for continuous action in search of a more just society. The program is co-sponsored by Adelphi University and the Gottesman Libraries.


In Conversation with Alex McLean, Thursday, 2/25, 6:30-7:17pm


Following the opening of Warping the Future, the Gottesman Libraries' commissioned art, we are hosting a series of conversations with artists featured in this exhibit. “In Conversation With” explores the artist’s projects, their take on the relationship between craft and technology, and how their practice relates to this intersection.


Alex McLean is a researcher at Deutsches Museum, Munich on the PENELOPE project, and he collaborates as a generalist with FoAM Kernow. He made the TidalCycles live coding environment. Since 2000 he has performed algorithmic and live coded music widely, performing solo as Yaxu. and as part of CCAI, one third of slub, and half of Canute. He also works with Kate Sicchio on the code+dance project Sound Choreographer <> Body Code and has sometimes improvised with such good folks as xname and Leafcutter John. His solo Peak Cut EP was released on Computer Club in 2015. I’ve been working on my album since forever. Alex is co-founder of algorithmic dance music promoters algorave, software art repository runme and on-line forum lurk. He is also co-founder of TOPLAP (a temporary organisation for the promotion of live algorithm programming), co-organiser of dorkbotsheffield, and latterly dorkbotlondon. He completed my PhD thesis “Artist Programmers and Programming Languages for the Arts” in late 2011, supervised by Geraint Wiggins within the ISMS group in Goldsmiths. He volunteer with Access Space, a charity working in the area of free digital culture in Sheffield, England.


Persons interested in attending may rsvp here.


News Displays


Need to keep current, look to the past, teach a topic? The Everett Cafe features daily postings of news from around the world, and also promotes awareness of historical events from an educational context. Be sure to check the Cafe News postings on the library blog.


The OED Is Published, Monday, 2/1

NAACP Is Founded, Friday, 2/12

Archaeologist Enters the Tomb of King Tut, Tuesday, 2/16

Winslow Homer Is Born, Wednesday, 2/24


Book Displays


Staff Picks: Transfiguring Bilingual Education, through February


Only in recent years has the focus of teaching bilingual students shifted from a reductive emphasis on making them proficient in English to a more comprehensive approach designed to help them flourish in both their languages. The term ‘emergent bilinguals’ brings the two languages into balance and assigns them equal value. This approach tries to reverse the harming effect that schools in the United States historically have had by viewing English as the all dominant lingua franca and not recognizing the importance of students’ native languages. This contemporary understanding incorporates multiple layers, considering cultural background, socioeconomic aspects, parent interaction and all factors that are part of the educational development of a child. The books selected in this collection have all been published in the last ten years and are based on this progressive approach. There is a spectrum of different focuses within this collection, although the fundamental subject is bilingual education for children. Some books specifically discuss strategies for engaging parents from diverse backgrounds, others look at the topic from a stance of applied linguistics, yet the goal of all is to provide ideas and methods to tailor the classroom experience to best meet the needs of bilingual students. The hope for this collection is that the books curated will be inspiring and helpful resources for educators at all levels. 

-- Clara Ruiz, Library Associate


Staff Picks is curated each month by the Gottesman Libraries' staff to highlight resources on educational topics and themes of special interest.


Everett Cafe: Warping the Future, through February

This book collection is part of "Warping the Future", an interactive exhibition that explores the connection between the history of crafting and the history of computing. It displays books that fit within the themes of:


  • History of weaving: touching on the art of craftsmanship, exploring societies that pioneered on this practice and how that shaped the materials and tools used, from the first weaving looms to the creation of the Jacquard Loom. 
  • Women’s work: from Ada Lovelace to every woman that played a vital role in the field of computer science, paving the way to all technological advances nowadays.
  • Computational algorithms and machine intelligence: how the history of weaving and the history of computing are interconnected, and how weaving patterns talk to programming languages. 


These books are primarily by women writers and artists and include a variety of formats such as historical, autobiography and conceptual pieces. Works are available for research and inspiration, some onsite, and most of them online at the Gottesman Libraries at Teachers College at Columbia University. 

--

At the Everett News Cafe, you'll find a new book collection every few weeks that relates to current affairs, education, or learning environments.


Exhibit: Warping the Future, beginning Thursday, 2/11


Warping the Future: How Craft Led To the Digital World As We Know, is an interactive exhibition that explores the history of crafting and the history of computing. It is presented in three stations: "Humans as Machines" exploring the history of weaving by interacting with a variety of looms, including the backstrap loom, warp-weighted loom, tapestry loom, floor loom, and Jacquard loom; visitors will learn about the origin of weaving, how ancient societies used them and which materials they weaved with. "Humans Automating Machines" delves into the "punch card way" as the core intersection between programmed computers and looms; visitors are exposed to the origins of programming by learning the logic behind the punch cards. In "Machines as Humans", viewers can search for curated collection of projects that illustrate more contemporary connections between ancient and new technologies.


Francesca Rodriguez Sawaya is a Peruvian creative producer and educator based in Brooklyn, New York. Francesca is a Lead Teacher in NYC First where she develops curriculum, manage a Maker Space and teach STEAM related subjects to low income communities. Her workshops include Creativity Lab at Brooklyn Museum and Tangible Data in Ahmedabad, India. Francesca earned an MPS in Interactive Telecommunications from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, a BA in Communication from the University of Lima, and a Diploma in Audiovisual Education from the University of Salamanca.


Renata de Carvalho Gaui is a Brazilian designer, artist, and creative technologist based in Brooklyn, New York. A "jill of all trades within art, design, and technology," Renata has engaged in numerous projects with positive educational impact, including Beyond Punch Cards, Weaving to Code, Coding to Weave; and The Art of Living, the 2018 Myers Fund Art Commission. She holds an MPS in Interactive Telecommunications from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and a BFA in Design and Digital Media from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro.


The virtual exhibit uses augmented reality and launches February 11th. Guest talks with participating artists will be conducted Thursdays, 6:30-7:15pm via video conference on the following dates: February 18th, February 25th, and March 4th.

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Made possible by a trust founded by Colonel Eugene Myers, which funds art education initiatives at Teachers College, the Gottesman Libraries Art Commission has brought relevant art content to the patrons of the Gottesman Libraries for many years. The aim of the Gottesman Libraries Art Commission is to create art experiences in the library that present themes of education, learning, and libraries through innovative work. In the last few years an effort to incorporate interaction and technology has been made in order to expose audiences to ideas and methods that are not part of traditional educational curriculum.


Highlighted Databases: Civic Education


In a time of new government, we reflect on the importance the theoretical, political, and practical aspects of citizenship, with opportunities for the development of activities and initiatives that encourage effective and responsible participation in civic life. Read more about highlighted research databases on the library's news page.


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To request disability-related accommodations contact OASID at oasid@tc.edu, (212) 678-3689, or (646) 755-3144 video phone, as early as possible.



Last Updated: 3:50 pm, Monday, Feb 15 , 2021